Imagine a regular cab truck and you'll probably conjure up one of two images. Either you'll picture a stripped-down cheapo work truck, or a mean factory muscle truck like a Lightning or SRT-10, but odds are you won't think of a personal luxury cruiser. Nick Accaro initially went the hot-rod route with some flashy flame graphics, but after his '02 Ram was stolen and then recovered, he decided to, "change it up a little bit."

For the right pavement-hugging stance, Nick turned to Duck at D.I.B. Customs in Houma, Louisiana, where the Ram's front suspension got a set of drop spindles, tubular control arms, and a pair of 26C Firestone 'bags. The rear of the Ram's frame was notched to clear the axle, and a four-link was welded and bolted in to allow for plenty of articulation, with the help of another set of 26C Firestone 'bags. When the sparks settled, Nick had plenty of room for his 24-inch KMC Maven wheels, especially after the rear axle was narrowed two inches per side.

With the suspension ready, Chris Amato tore into the body and removed the door handles, gas filler door, and tailgate handle. A Sir Michael's roll pan tidied up the rear of the truck, and a Street Scene bumper cover finished up the front along with a matching Street Scene Speed Grille. Inside the bed, new wheelwells were formed and a driveline tunnel was added to the forward portion of the bed to eliminate interference. Putting the welder aside, the focus shifted to giving the Ram a fresh coat of Cyber Green paint over the entire body and most of the interior, along with a light coat on the taillights.

Besides the Cyber Green paint, the interior was upgraded to deluxe accommodations with the addition of about two cows worth of leather. The headliner is ostrich-textured leather, while the seats are off-the-showroom-floor La-Z-Boy chairs. Now Nick can cruise his Ram in comfort typically reserved for a living room, with his hands firmly wrapped around, what else, a leather-wrapped billet steering wheel. Nick had the comfort, and the look, the only thing missing was the sound, so Anything Car Audio in Kenner, Louisiana, was put in charge of all things audio. The most obvious modification is a 13-inch monitor mounted in the dash that displays video from an Xbox. The Alpine head unit sends signals to two Kicker 10-inch subs behind the seats and the separates in the doors. The entire system is powered by two Directed Electronics amps stashed below the huge seats.

Nick's Ram has got a cushy ride and plush seats, just like Chryslers, Lincolns, and Cadillacs from the late 70's, but without the weak smog-era engine and Huggy Bear vibe. Not a bad combo. Special thanks go out to Duck at D.I.B, Chris "Slick" Amato, and Wesley Cato at Anything Car Audio for all of their hard work.

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