Recently we have seen a major influx of custom pickup activity coming from our neighbors to the north. Our email boxes are being bombarded to the point of us having to constantly pester our IT department for assistance, and an increasing number of snail mail correspondence that we receive bears Canadian stamps and postmarks. Don't get the wrong idea though, we aren't complaining. Not the least bit. In fact, we've loved the insurgence, since we're getting a better understanding of the Canadian take on chopped-up trucks. Take a look, for instance, at Richard Hammer's ultra clean '67 Chevy C10. Richard hails from Viking, Alberta, Canada, and honestly, we'd be hard pressed to find competition for his truck anywhere else on Earth.

So what makes this truck so special? Well, it's far too premature in this tale to address such a question, and by the time you've made your way to the end, the answer should be crystal clear anyway. For starters, however, the Chevy's frame was completely boxed and polished, and a set of Mustang II spindles from Scott's Hotrods was brought in to help bring the front end down around the 20x8-inch Billet Specialties SLC75 wheels and General Exclaim 255/30R20 rubber. Slam Specialties 'bags are responsible for the heavy lifting, and Belltech Nitro-Drop shocks keep the ride as smooth as can be. Lester Sawers and Christoffer Lange of Kool Rides By Design, in Bruce, Alberta, Canada handled the installation of the components, but more importantly, they built a one-off four-link with a custom wishbone to bring the rearend to ground level height. Out back resides 22x11-inch SLC75 hoops, wrapped in a pair of General 275/35R22 skins.

To get the rolling attire spinning at blurring speeds, Fern Pedro and Keith Black were recruited to create a breakneck power plant underneath the hood. A Chevy 383ci stroker engine was selected as the weapon of choice, and it was nicely paired with a B&M 4L60 transmission for a more than adequate driving experience. AFR 195cc polished heads, an Eagle Specialty Products rotating assembly, Crane Cam roller rockers, a Comp cam, and a custom exhaust with a set of headers help propel Richard's C10 from points A to B in a hurry. The results of the under-hood wrenching created 432 horses and 455 lb-ft torque, which proves this fine specimen features equally impressive attributes of brawn and beauty.

The C10's killer physique was completely formulated by Kool Rides By Design who first increased the Chevy's cosmetic value by decreasing the number of unnecessary components. Gone forever are the driprails, parking lights, and the door and tailgate handles, and a few inches from the actual body as it was sectioned and chopped to perfection. A nine-inch stock-floor body drop was also performed in order to preemptively cure any acrophobic tendencies that Richard may or may not have been aware of. To score a few originality points, a custom grille insert was created from a piece that was meant to be stuffed into a big ol' Peterbilt grille shell. Once every panel was straightened and molded to Lester's liking, he encased the thoroughly-massaged metal in stunningly deep House of Kolor Tangelo Pearl.

The attention to detail didn't stop with the shaping of the C10's exterior, as can be noticed with a brief peek inside of the cab. The bench seat and custom door panels have been covered with beige and brown leather, and the party solely responsible for the complete hide redesign is Arlo's Upholstery in Red Deer, Alberta, Canada. A Billet Specialties 'Hustler' steering wheel was planted on the dash to tie in with the similarly designed spokes of the exterior SLC75 wheels. With a healthy amount of billet accessories peppered throughout the cab, the need for a sonically dynamic audio system quickly presented itself. An Alpine head unit was sunk dead center into the custom dash, and an entire cast of Alpine amps, speakers, and subs were strung together to achieve the purest of audible bliss.

If you've reached this point in the story and are still questioning this C10's credibility as one of the cleanest ever built, by all means, show yourself the door-quickly. Having owned this truck since May of '87, Richard spent only two years nurturing a seemingly far off vision of his dream vehicle into a tire-screeching, pavement-punishing reality. That's not long at all given the fact that this truck's impact will resonate in the minds of custom pickup enthusiasts across the globe for many years to come.

  • «
  • |
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
  • |
  • View Full Article