Forty-two days doesn't seem like a whole lot of time to take a stock vehicle and turn it into a mobile sound bomb, but when there's a deadline looming overhead, anything can happen. The project specimen was an '07 GMC Yukon. The deadline came in the form of the 4th annual Pioneer Sound Build-Off on April 28, 2010, and the crew behind the mayhem happened to be John Irwin and Travis Williams of Sound Waves, in Memphis, Tennessee. You may have heard of the event before, but for those of you who haven't, Pioneer supplies select certified dealers nationwide with roughly $10,000 worth of the same Stage 4 audio components. The objective for each shop is to create an audio system that is geared toward pumping out pure sound quality as well as attractively displaying Pioneer's state-of-the-art gear.

John, owner of Sound Waves, and his crew did not take the challenge lightly since sound quality and attention to the slightest of details is always priority number one. When the crew tore into Pioneer's ten-thousand dollar care package, they found a collection of mint condition audio gold pieces that would come close to blowing the roof off of the Yukon. The gem in the lot was the DEX-P99RS head unit, which is an audiophile's wet dream since it's able to unearth minute complexities, even in songs that you've heard a thousand times before. Two 10-inch TS-W252PRS subwoofers were next to be discovered, and would provide almost enough bass to shatter every pane of the GMC's glass. To complement the low frequencies, Pioneer made sure to supply their Stage 4 TS-C172PRS 6 3/4-inch components, and TS-S062PRS 2 5/8-inch component midrange speakers. Powering the subs are two 1,200-watt PRS-D1200SPL monoblock amplifiers, and two PRS-A900 four-channel filter-less amps for the highs and mids. As anyone could imagine, these ingredients make for some of the purest musical playback experiences imaginable, but there is more to an impressionable sound system than just a box full of assorted parts-no matter their caliber.

The Sound Waves crew completely gutted the Yukon's interior in order to apply a layer of Stinger Roadkill sound deadening material underneath the carpet and door panels. To house the speakers in the A-pillars and door panels, custom pods were formed using acrylic formed in a vacuum mold made from medium-density fiberboard (MDF). A fiberglass sub enclosure was fabricated, and not only gives the two Pioneer pounders plenty of breathing room, but it classes up the confines with its charcoal-colored suede accent and prepped and painted surface. As for the monstrous amp rack, John and Travis created an MDF frame then covered it in fiberglass, vinyl, and more suede to complete a deep, thematic atmosphere. Blue LED backlighting can be found everywhere, which quickly ignites the GMC's exciting nightlife.

With the Yukon now bumping with the best of them, the guys at Sound Waves reluctantly freed their ears from the addictive sound supply, and paid the Yukon's exterior some attention. First, the suspension was dropped with a Belltech 2/4 drop kit, and complemented with a set of 24x8-inch painted-to-match Boss wheels wrapped in 305/35R24 Nexen tires.

Over the course of six weeks and 800 man-hours, Sound Waves was able to transform a dealership darling into a mobile audio assault vehicle just in time to put their craftsmanship and Pioneer's products to the test. Anything is possible when a two-man team puts in 14-hour work shifts, seven days a week.