For every feature truck we shoot, we ask the owner to fill out that we refer to as a "Tech Sheet". It's a four-page print out that asks about all of the custom work done so that everyone that helped out on the build gets their due, and it helps us write the article when months can go by between shooting the photos and writing the feature. While the Tech Sheet helps us with the facts of which parts were used, we also have a spot on the sheet that asks the owner why he chose to build his truck. When Carlos Recendes Jr. told us he built his '02 Ford SuperCrew because he enjoys the "friendly competition," it truly helps to see him with his fellow truck enthusiasts in the Xplizit truck club to understand Xpilzit's definition of "friendly." The guys go back and forth between talking about their favorite trucks to giving each other a hard time about their own projects, all in good fun, of course. Still, you can be sure that all of the members of Xplizit have both a nice truck and thick skin.

Andy and Adam Diaz at M.I.C., in Chino, California, were given the task of dropping Carlos' Blue Oval on its frame. They fabricated a six-link using Slam Specialties bags to tuck the 24x9-inch Lexani LX-30s into the SuperCrew bed. To get the full-width wheels to work with such a low stance, the rear axle was narrowed two inches per side and the rear framerails were C-notched and reinforced. The front features its own custom touches, as spindles were fabricated to get the perfect drop while retaining drivability. The arms were given Firestone 'bags and M.I.C.'s signature shocks before they were plumbed with 3/4-inch lines. To make room for the Lexani wheels that were now taking up residence inside the engine bay, M.I.C. relocated the twin batteries to the bed that features tall cylindrical tubs, a notch, and spray-in bedliner. Speaking of the engine bay, Carlos boosted the power by upgrading the 5.4L with a set of free-flowing Mustang heads, a CGS intake, and Hypertech programmer.

Turning to the bodywork, Carlos acquired a Lightning bumper cover, billet grille, and projector headlights to mix things up, while the rear taillights were smoked. The fender emblems were shaved, and replaced with small polished billet Lexani shields. Carlos decided to keep all of his door and tailgate handles, but in billet rather than plastic. Each piece was given a few coats of candy blue to blend in with the Candy Cobalt Blue and Hawk Black two-tone. The Hawk Black has just enough blue pearl in it to be noticed in the right light. Mike Lamberson of Draggin Lines outdid himself with the silver leaf and pinstriping, adding classic turning marks to the delicate silver along the entire beltline of the Ford, with extra silverleaf and blue pinstriping details on the hood and tailgate.

The interior of the SuperCrew features more blues and black thanks to California Upholstery in Bell Gardens, California. The factory F-150 buckets were wrapped in black leather, both smooth and elephant textured, with diamond-stitched blue leather and blue stingray inserts. The rear seats are copies of the front, while the pillars, door panels, and dash use leather in addition to blue suede and diamond-texture Teflon fabric. Also in the dash is the Clarion head unit that sends signals to the Clarion components in each door. Carlos built an out-of-the-way sub box behind the rear seats to house three Kicker 10-inch subs before the system was wired by Car Stereo Connection in Anaheim, California. Above the entire cab is a Webasto Grand View panoramic moonroof that leaves over four feet of the headliner open to the sky.

After serving as his daily driver for five years, Carlos took three years to transform this F-150 into the custom creation that he still drives regularly. He doesn't regret a thing and considers the truck to be a work-in-progress. He wanted to give special thanks to M.I.C., Lexani, CCE, R1 Concepts, and his friends in Xplizit for their work and support in making a truck that he can still drive every day while taking pride in every passing mile.