When Taylor Patin first got in touch with us at Showfest last year, his ’82 C10 was looking good, well on its way to becoming a feature-worthy specimen. Starting with a handed-down C10 from his older brother, with body panels cobbled from different colored trucks, Taylor saw the potential of his daily driver when others couldn’t. After an unfortunate altercation with a rather sturdy tree, the C10 was totaled. But in less than a year, it had ditched its static drop and mismatched colors for the air suspension you see now. When we first saw it, the interior was not quite finished and the bodywork was still wearing primer, but Taylor’s intentions were clear and the potential was obvious. Unfortunately, there just wasn’t enough time to schedule a shoot for a Busted Knuckles feature, so we made sure to make room for him and his truck at Scrapin’ the Coast, which was only six weeks away. Once we arrived at the Biloxi, Mississippi, show, we were disappointed that we couldn’t find the primered Chevy among the rows and rows of custom trucks. We did, however, notice a flat red C10 that had a great stance and a freshly restored interior. It didn’t take us long to realize that Taylor had been a busy man in the six weeks since we’d last seen him.

Taylor’s specialty is bodywork, which is evident in the C10’s smooth and flawless skin. Several subtle modifications served to set the truck apart from its common work truck brethren, including shaved driprails, lock cylinders, and marker lights, but what took us the longest to realize was the bed modification. Taylor started with a stepside because so few of them are used for the basis of a custom. Taylor shortened the bed between the back of the rear fender and the tailgate, by three inches, to make the tailgate more flush with the rear of the fenders. The entire bed floor was moved up to just a few inches under the bedrails and an oak floor was installed separated by flat red stringers held in place with stainless steel carriage bolts. A set of ’54 Chevrolet truck taillights were hung from the rear corners of the bed and the front of the truck was taken care of with a sectioned, shaved, and painted bumper and a phantom grille. The unusual paint choice truly gives Taylor’s Chevy a unique look, and it’s not all that complicated. The prepped body was sprayed with Kustom Shop’s Hot Rod Flatz, which includes just the right amount of flattening agent for a satin sheen, in a single stage application.

The interior of the Chevy is just as red as the exterior because Taylor installed new carpet and upholstery from LMC Trucks along with a painted and dyed dash. Even the seatbelts are red. Billet window cranks, dash trim, Vintage Air HVAC controls, and an APC steering wheel offer some contrast, while the rest of the custom touches are hidden. For example, the Sony head unit and 6.5-inch components are out of sight, and the airbag switches are concealed where the factory flipdown ashtray used to reside.

Since Taylor was the man behind the paint and bodywork as well as the interior, it should come as no surprise that he also handled the chassis fabrication and suspension work. The rear suspension is a four-link of Taylor’s design that uses Firestone bags fed by 38-inch stainless lines. The front suspension consists of Belltech drop spindles and modified lower arms with bag pockets recessed 21/2 inches. To really drop the front, Taylor Z’d the frame three inches. With the front crossmember tucked up out of the way, a set of 22x9-inch U2 55 wheels wrapped in Sunny 255/30R22 rubber were bolted on and the truck is just shy of laying rocker when aired out.

Moving the C10 from one shop to the next so that he’d have a place to work on it, Taylor completed the build of his truck just under a year after it was involved in an accident. He’d like to thank everyone that helped accommodate him and his truck including: his parents, Desiree, Sergio at Deranged Rides, T-Sam, Shea, Big J., Sid, Andy, Hunter, Brandon Cruz, Mason, Thibs Bump & Grind, RimPros, and all his buddies in No Regrets.