There is something inherently cool about a big dualie laid out on its frame. Clint Diesburg, of Texas City, Texas, shares our sentiment because he is currently in the process of building a 1999 Ford F-350 Super Duty. He has been building it for two years now and if it weren’t for his mother, he would have scrapped the project long ago. Unfortunately, Clint’s mom passed away in October before he could finish the build and he is finishing the project in her memory. After years of blood, sweat, and tears, he is about halfway done and is using the motivation his mom instilled to complete it.

After buying the dualie, Clint lifted the Ford and towed a fifth wheel around the country for about eight years before deciding to give the truck a completely different attitude. To start, Clint had the front suspension torn apart and looked for a way to bring the big Super Duty down to Earth. The factory I-beams had to be ditched in favor of a ¾-ton spindles and A-arm setup from a Chevy HD. For steering, an idler arm from an F-150 was used in conjunction with a drag link, and instead of inner and outer tie rods, Clint used ¾-inch Heim joints. For spindles, Chassis Tech 3-inch drop spindles were used and the front was finished up with a set of DJM shocks and Slam Specialties HE-8 ’bags supplied by ½-inch hardlines and ½-inch Parker SS valves. Out back, a simple two-link was used with a Panhard bar to locate the rearend. A pair of RE-8 ’bags were installed over the axle, which was narrowed eight inches and uses Moser Engineering axles. In order for the truck to lay frame, the engine had to be raised three inches and the transmission two inches. For rolling stock, six Alcoa 24-inch Classic Round Hole wheels were wrapped in Sunny 285/35R24 rubber.

With the suspension taken care of, the body was the next hurdle. Clint wanted a refreshed look, so he installed a 2007 F-350 front clip. The door handles, badging, tailgate handle, and gas filler were all shaved for a super-clean look. Out back, Carlos Bernal removed the factory taillights and molded in a set of Cadillac replacements. For added clearance in the rear, the fenders were sectioned two inches, widened, and heightened to clear the 24-inch dualie wheels. Since the photo shoot, the truck has been sanded smooth and blanketed with several coats of PPG Black and Torch Red paint, followed by clear to seal it all in.

Finally, the interior could be taken care of. The dash has been smoothed and painted, the seats rewrapped in black and red leather, and the steering wheel replaced with a billet banjo substitute. Still to come are the door panels, headliner, and audio. Clint also has to smooth the bed and add some finishing touches to the engine.

So far, Clint has received a lot of help on his project and wanted to thank Robbie Santino from A&R Customs, Carlos Bernal from Bernal Auto Designs, Milo Reyna, and Ricky Rygard. Keep an eye out on truckinweb.com for updates and watch for a full feature on Clint’s Super Duty in Truckin’ magazine.