Creating a racer support vehicle usually means that vehicle is going to see some thrash time due to the constant loading and unloading of tools and gear. Rarely are the trucks designed for such missions adorned in many creature comforts because a dirty pit crew and broken parts will turn anything nice into a short-lived memory. Exceptions to the rule are always out there and this 2011 Ford F-350 dualie is just that exception. Designed by father and son team, Paul and Jason Hulst, the big crew cab was commissioned by Snap-On tools to serve as not only a showpiece, but also a team support vehicle to carry plenty of professional series tools and also provide entertainment during any downtime. A lofty goal to be sure, but the Hulst Customs boys are no strangers to Ford trucks, having built a number of vehicles shown in magazine pages and at SEMA, where we found this one all shined up under the show’s bright lights.

It’s fairly obvious this rig has been lowered a touch from it’s factory height. Closing the gap between the fenders and the tires is a complete suspension system from DJM. The nose of the Ford is three inches closer to the pavement thanks to a pair of sturdy tubular Dream Beams. Out back, the bed of the dualie was lowered five inches by flipping the axle from under to over the heavy-duty leafsprings. A set of nitrogen-charged shocks control the banging and bouncing of road undulations. Fully polished American Force Snap wheels in 24x8¼-inch originally started life as 10-lug, 24½-inch big rig wheels. With proper machining, they now fit a sextuplet of Pirelli Scorpion tires sized 305/50R24. Ford F-350 trucks do not come from the factory with 10-lug hubs, so adapters from American Force alter the 8-lug pattern to fit the much more aggressive-looking 10-bolt pattern wheels. Look closely at the wheels. You will notice the holes were cut into 12-point patterns mimicking a fastening tool. This truck is, after all, a Snap-On truck and details like that are totally befitting.

Plenty of time and effort went into designing aero parts to fit the new ’11 Super Duty giving the Lariat a much sportier skin. Most may not notice but the hood has had its original hoodscoop brought forward towards the customized grille. The stock bumper remains up front, fit with custom tow hooks designed to appear as two giant box wrench heads. An air dam meets filler panels at each side of the bumper that flow into the one-off fender flares. Rocker covers block the ugly view of the frame, and fill the void between the body and the painted running boards. Hulst went so far as to design a set of rear dualie fenders in the factory style, but oversized with flowing lines to accommodate the protruding wheels and tires. Enclosing the bed and providing privacy for the array of Snap-On tools and Sony audio/video gear is a Gaylord’s tonneau cover. What began as a Vermillion Red body coating is now a hot rod–esque two-tone of Bright White and Candy Red from Planet Color. The new color scheme gives the Ford truck Snap-On’s unmistakable signature look.

Opening the Gaylord’s tonneau reveals a bed full of the things every custom truck guy would love to see—tools, speakers, and a big TV. Mounted on a Bed Slide, Snap-On built a custom toolbox just for the truck. Directly behind the two-drawer toolbox, an articulating arm provides the sturdy mount for a 32-inch Sony TV. The Bed Slide also serves as the mounting point for a custom Katzkin leather-covered sub enclosure with two 10-nch Sony subs and two 6-inch components. Red leather-covered custom bedsides now house two large Sony Xplod amps powering all of the Sony audio. We can’t speak for the Snap-On race team, but for us, it sure would be tough to focus on grabbing the right wrench with all of that cool entertainment in the bed. Now that’s a great problem to have.

Inside the four-door cabin is a sea of red covering nearly every original part and panel from the Lariat package. A bit more luxurious now thanks to Ed Harr Upholstery, Katzkin leather seat covers were embroidered with the Snap-On logo both front and rear. Leather covers the headliner and most every panel has either been painted to match the interior or done in contrasting red to match the exterior. Mesh grille inserts were fit into the door panel pockets, adding a bit of raciness to the otherwise upscale appearance. Entertainment is provided by Sony Xplod with a DVD head unit in the dash, separates throughout, dual subwoofers, and amplifiers to match. The subwoofers were built into the center console with one facing up and one protruding into the rear passenger floor. It’s that subwoofer in particular to take note of. The brackets mounting it to the floor are Snap-On box wrenches, which carries over the tool theme from the outside, to the inside. As if that weren’t enough to keep passengers happy, Sony LCD screens were stuffed in the headrests for the rear seat crew to enjoy.

Having been in business more than 90 years, Snap-On tools continues its tradition of excellence by outfitting an already great truck with its products to show and support its teams. Who wouldn’t want to work from the back of this truck or be the designated driver to events? With a bed full of top-quality tools, a gutsy 6.7L diesel under the hood, and a comfy interior to set one’s behind, this tool-inspired rig has all anyone needs to hit the highways or tracks across this nation. We’re already in line to get our turn, so if you want in, the rest of the line forms to the left.

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