Everything in the truck world is a contest. It’s always about the lowest, loudest, fastest, tallest, tucking the biggest wheels, or clearing the biggest tires. But, what happens when you just build a truck that you want instead of one that everyone else wants you to? Do you still ’bag it, lift it, shave it, or paint it a hundred crazy colors? If you’re Julio Trevino, you simply build a red truck with a clean interior and some power under the hood. A static drop and billet wheels are about as exciting as it gets. Well, maybe it’s not quite that simple.

The real story is a bit deeper. Julio is a member of the Ground Zero truck club in Texas, and the truck’s suspension was done at Drops ‘R’ Us. Both of those names are well known in these pages and should serve as a warning that there’s a bit more than meets the eye with this ’07 Chevy Silverado. Drops ‘R’ Us likes to get serious with static lowering parts and this truck is no different. The front suspension consists of drop spindles, lowering coils, and lowered control arms. Even more parts are under the bed with the drop having a flip kit, blocks, hangers, and shackles. The parts add up to a mind bottling (you know, it traps your mind in a bottle) 10-inch front and 15-inch rear drop from stock. QA1 shocks at all corners keep the Texas highways from knocking the low Silverado off trajectory. Looking like they shouldn’t be able to roll are 24x9 and super-wide 24x15 Intro Visa II wheels barley wrapped in Pirelli rubberbands. You’ll find Pirelli 285/30R24 and huge 405/25R24 sizes if you look close enough.

Julio ditched the anemic factory engine for something that provides more entertainment value. Sitting between the framerails is now is a 6.2L LS3 that charges a much heavier beat. Chago’s Car Care gave the engine a thorough going-over and felt a little coaxing would bring some additional ponies to gallop. A Comp Cam bumpstick was slipped in the block along with thicker pushrods and double valvesprings to handle the larger lift. Eight 47-pound injectors allow enough fuel to reach the cylinders to help satisfy the craving of the 150hp shot of nitrous. Engine modifications end with an underdrive pulley and custom speed density tune. Pacesetter headers aim used fuel and air molecules out an SLP Loudmouth exhaust system. Behind the LS3 mill is a 4L65E beefed up with a Transgo shift kit and a 3,200-stall converter by Noe’s Transmission. An Eaton posi and 3.90 gears can spin the Pirelli tires into destruction at will.

Casual observers would never know anything was changed on the Silverado’s body but the keen eye can tell the truth. Chevrolet’s entire HD nose from a new ’11 was swapped onto the standard cab ½-ton. Even the rear bumper was taken from an HD. What hides it all and keeps it sedate in appearance is the in-your-face Victory Red laid down by Joe Mendoza at Pistoleros Paint and Design. The right amount of factory trim was left black to properly complement the swooping black graphic applied down the sides of Julio’s ride. A skeleton appears to be crawling from the piercing darkness at the rear of the graphic. Inside the bed, the wheel tubs and notch cover were coated in spray-on bedliner tinted to match the red hue given the truck. Dual nitrous bottles and an aluminum fuel cell lend onlookers a hint at what’s lurking under the hood.

Inside the standard cab, things are still just as subtle but also over the top. The top half of the dash and door panels have been completely smoothed and painted almond color along with the rear wall trim, which has a couple of MB Quart speakers ’glassed into it. To accommodate the large 17-inch in-dash screen, the factory stereo was tossed and the HVAC controls were relocated. An Eclipse head unit is now the keeper of the music from the one-off center console. Three JL Audio amplifiers and four 10-inch JL Audio W3 subwoofers round out the sound design installed by Tiny’s Shop. Black carpet covers the floor while Peanut Butter leather and Almond suede cover the seats, handiwork by Arjonas upholstery. A custom-made billet steering wheel from Dima Wheels replaces the tough-to-customize stock unit.

Julio bought the truck brand new and, of course, did not plan on heavily modifying the truck. Life has a funny way of swinging the pendulum on some of our decisions and this decision took Julio 21/2 years to not plan on doing. We’re sure the backing of his Ground Zero club members had a hand in his decision to just go all in. It took a crew to get it done and Julio could not have made this possible without friends at Drops ‘R’ Us, Noe’s Transmission, Pistoleros Paint and Design, Arjonas Upholstery, Da Shop, and Dima Wheels. We can only hope his next truck doesn’t take nearly as long to build. If he builds trucks like this without a plan, we can’t wait to see what happens when he really wants to get down.

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