Whether it's the curvy '67-'72 C10, the boxy square body, or the quintessential '88-'98, Chevy trucks have become a mainstay of the 'bagged truck scene. However, while we see plenty of regular, Extended Cab, and Crew Cab Chevys, we rarely see 'bagged builds using the GM fullsize lineup's next of kin: the Suburban. For Eric Gump, a decal installer from Spokane, Washington, a 1989 GMC Suburban was the ideal vehicle for hauling his family and friends around town. Eric had built custom trucks in the past, so after picking up the 'Burban for $2,500 back in 2003, he began molding it into something that transcended the ordinary family vehicle.

Working out of his garage and driveway, Eric started by tearing down the stock Chevy suspension. To accommodate the huge drop he had planned, an 8-inch step notch was cut into the rear of the frame, while the front received a 2½-inch Z. Then, Dominator 2600 airbags were added to all four corners, in addition to 2½-inch drop spindles up front and a Suicide Doors triangulated four-link out back. The whole setup results in a full foot drop, slamming the GMC to the ground. Topping off the new stance is a set of 22-inch chrome Detata wheels wrapped in Falken rubber.

Moving on to bodywork, Eric turned to his friend "Werm" Hahn, who sculpted and smoothed the truck's sheetmetal. The fenders, hood, rain gutters, and antenna were shaved, a roll pan was added in the back, and a license plate box was frenched into the rear door for a cleaner look. Eric tells us his favorite mod so far, the vertical Cadillac taillights, were time consuming to install. However, they subtly clean up the rear end and help this boxy 'Burban look sleeker. Finally, the whole setup was sprayed in PPG DP-90 matte-black primer, giving it a stealthy new look.

Inside the GMC, Eric kept it simple, adding a Kenwood stereo, Sony speakers, and Grant steering wheel, as well as new gray carpet and a fabric-wrapped dash. Eric isn't quite sure the direction he wants to take his Suburban next, since the project is always evolving and changing. However, for now he's satisfied riding low and having the coolest family hauler on the block. Eric would like to thank his wife Brandy, his friends "Werm" Hahn, Brian Arnold, Jason Knauft, and Steve Harrington, and his fellow club members at Twisted Creations for their help and support.