As part of our continued improvement for 2010, we're opening up our Readers' Rap section to those of you having a hard time getting an answer to a tough truck question. Send in whatever is stumping you and if we can't answer it, or if we think your question is going to help out other people with a problem, we'll send you free truck gear. It's just that easy. Also, if we did something to tick you off, did something that you liked, or even if you want to make a suggestion, feel free to contact us at brandan.gillogly@sorc.com and we'll do our best to respond. This month's free giveaway is a pair of Mechanix gloves to protect your mitts while turning those wrenches. For more info, check out mechanix.com.

Dear Truckin',
I want to install a 6.0L LQ9 engine from a late-model truck into my C10, but I want to run a carb. I've heard that since these trucks never used a distributor you still have to use some sort of computer to run the ignition. What's the deal?
Joe Mead
Topeka, Kansas

Joe,
You've got a couple of options on your ignition. GM Performance Parts (part # 19171130) and Edelbrock (part #7118) both make an intake and ignition kit that uses the crank trigger and an ignition box to fire the coil-on-plug ignition. GM Performance Parts also makes a front-drive distributor kit (part #88958679) that replaces the timing cover. You will also need a small-block Ford style distributor and a new harmonic balancer, adding cost, so this route might be best left for racing divisions that require a distributor. Besides, people will keep asking you why you put a Ford engine in your Chevy.

Dear Truckin',
I look forward to your recently announced '89 C1500 project truck, although I confess I expect to be disappointed. I know you need advertising dollars, which means showcasing bolt-ons from your advertisers, but it would be nice to see something original once in a while. I've noticed there is a distinct lack of originality in the pictures of trucks at shows. The interior and paint are the only places most people seem to express themselves. Why not build a grille, something really different and original, or a bumper? Ground effects packages aren't available for this truck anymore, so what about making your own? Shop for automotive fabric and stitch your own seat covers and upholstery. Any fool with money can take his truck to a shop and say, "do this". In my humble opinion, DIY is more rewarding and will be the wave of the foreseeable future in these hard economic times.
Lloyd Pierce
Via Truckinweb.com

Lloyd,
We think you make a great point, and I've put some thought into making a grille for the project truck, but I am a bit leery of trying to make a body kit or bumper. The reason bolt-ons are so popular is that everyone has a basic set of tools, while few people have the capability to fabricate with sheetmetal to the extent required to turn out a good-looking body kit. If we showed how to make a body kit and bumpers and all you needed was a sheetmetal brake, a planishing hammer, and a few years of metalworking experience, only a handful or readers would benefit from the article. This project will be more budget-oriented, and we will do as much of the work in-house as possible, but we also want to be realistic and show readers what they can do themselves.

Guys,
I have been searching for '95-'99 Chevy Tahoe/Suburban door panels with the four window switches and door lock switch. I plan on putting them in my single cab '98 GMC and using the two extra window switches to control my bags. I cannot find them anywhere. I would greatly appreciate it if you could help me with this problem.
Jeremie Teran
Via Truckinweb.com

Jeremie,
That sounds like a good idea to keep your interior nice and sanitary. We pulled up LMC Truck's online catalog for Suburbans and Tahoes (at LMCtruck.com) and the parts you're looking for are #39-6688 for the switch plate and 29-8108 for the switches. Both parts will set you back $149.99, a pretty good deal considering that it includes two momentary switches for your 'bags. Good luck on your project!