Way back in 2003, this 1972 Chevrolet was just a work truck treated without any love. After receiving a light makeover that saw completion in mid-2004, the truck was sitting on the street minding its own business when disaster reared its ugly head. Apparently, a commercial truck driver who wasn't paying attention managed to slam his 12-ton dump truck into the poor C10, wiping out the whole left side off the truck. With an insurance check in hand, the truck was inspired like a Phoenix to rise from its destruction.

Although the C10 was originally fit with trailing arms, the truck was back-halved with the frame from a Blazer, effectively converting the coil sprung rear to leaf springs. Four inches of drop up front is achieved through spindles and coils with the same amount of lowering achieved in the rear through hangers and shackles. A 3.08-geared 12-bolt hangs under the fully smoothed and painted frame. Desiring a powerful cruiser, a GM Performance Parts ZZ383 was reworked with Edelbrock RPM heads, a larger camshaft, and a Demon 750 carburetor. Breathing through Sanderson headers and a Flowmaster exhaust, the mighty small-block now rumbles with 425 hp. Power is fed to the rear thanks to a Turbo 350 3-speed auto. Michelin tires envelope classy 17- and 18-inch Budnik Fontana wheels.

A fair amount of work went in to rebuilding the truck's exterior metal thanks to the beating it took. Both front fenders were shaved of their marker lights and a straight 1969 cab was located and fit with new rockers and a partial floor before having the firewall smoothed of all its openings. The doors were modified for one-piece side glass. A new fleetside bed was supplied by Classic Industries and loaded with an oak floor and polished stainless bed strips. The stake pockets were welded shut, marker lights nixed, and a roll pan found a new home in place of the rear bumper. All that fresh skin was hidden under the vibrant House of Kolor True Blue and Orion Silver laid down by L&G Enterprises. The interior of the truck is where it's at with a custom aluminum and 'glass dash built to mimic the '60s Corvettes. Filled with Auto Meter gauges and dark Burlwood panels, it screams hot rod. Modified Honda Accord seats were slathered in Mercedes leather matching the one-off door panels, headliner, and Mercedes carpet. Sound emanates from a complete surround-sound stereo system with multiple hidden speakers throughout the cabin. Subwoofers and amplifiers are mounted in a leather-wrapped custom rear wall. Resembling the interior of a much nicer vehicle, the interior is a place any of us would love to call our own

With the cost to build figure coming in at an astronomical $100,000 it's easy to get lost in all the little details we could not go into here. Pour over the pictures for a little inspiration on your next classic truck project. Maybe there is something there for you.